Edinburgh Rail Paths

Edinburgh Rail Paths

One of Edinburgh’s greatest assets is its old 19th century rail lines, since converted into wide multi-use paths that criss-cross the city, beneath main roads, and along the canals and waterways.  They are lush and tranquil and an excellent way of getting about. In summer they’re lined with wild flowers, and sprawling berry bushes ripe with fruit.

I decided to amble along a new route (bordering the Warriston Cemetery), and was rewarded with a gorgeous old bridge with an unusual pattern to its brickwork.  Most of the bridges I’ve encountered so far are enchanting (I think so anyway).  They are solid and imposing; they were built to last.  Generally they are a creamy yellow/orange stone, with a bright green algal tinge, and black soot residue creates interesting patterns against the chiseled slabs.  This is the first time I’ve noticed such a distinct spiral pattern in the bricks; the others have all generally been squared off.  I found it a bit challenging to photograph as the end point of the tunnel created an over exposure problem that my Lightroom skills aren’t quite up to resolving, but overall, the contrast of soot and stone is quite mesmerising.

Allotments, Chancelot Path

Off With Their Heads

Water of Leith Walk, Stockbridge

Water of Leith Walk, Stockbridge

Rail Bridge, Chancelot Path

Rail Bridge, Chancelot Path

Rail Bridge, Chancelot Path

Wild Flowers, Hawthornvale Path

Wild Flowers, Hawthornvale Path

 

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